Portfolio says ...

Click Me!

Online Grocery Shopping Experience
Photo
Introduction
This project zoomed into how 'Buy Me a New Home' customers engaged in online grocery shopping - why they engage in online grocery shopping and their current mobile experience while shopping for grocery using Grocery Gateway mobile app. Grocery Gateway has a mobile and web-based grocery shopping application and they focus on delivering quality service to customers from the screen display all the way to the physical delivery of orders. From the interview it was confirmed that persons from the 'Buy Me A New Home' group usually shop for grocery online because they want to save time and find it convenient. Whether they shop online or in the physical store they usually shop on a budget. However, grocery shopping differs from the physical grocery shopping because customers can't be sure on exactly what grocery they would receive and they usually shop for grocery on a weekly basis and this grocery usually go into meal preparations for their families. We also identified certain areas on Grocery Gateway mobile app that could improve user experience and were tasked to demonstrate how showing the calculated price in real-time while customers update the quantity of a product can improve their experience.
Date:
October, 2017 - January, 2018
Project:
Improving Online Grocery Shopping Experience
Name:
Shafeeza Hussain, Rajapaksha, Tejpal Singh, Nasrullah, Vamshi
Skills:
  • Contextual Inquiry
  • Persona Creation
  • Discussion Guide and Interviewing
  • Affinity Diagramming
  • Scenario Mapping
Photo
Problem/Opportunity
Shopping for grocery online differs from the physical grocery shopping and other online shopping. A new user may also have a different experience from a current online grocery shopper. Similarly, a user's experience might be different if they use their mobile phones as opposed to their laptops. Therefore, to improve users' experience it is important to empathize with current and prospective customers and observe them as they shop for grocery online.
Photo
Overall view of the process we took for this project.m
Please click to view larger image or hover to zoom in on image.
User Centered Design Process
Below gives more details to what happened during the different stages. As this was our first time doing a user experience design project of this sort it was not a process we could have foreseen but it naturally happened as we were completing assignments.
Photo
Early User Observation
My team and I first tried to reflect on shopping in general, empathize with persons from 'Buy Me a New Home' user group and focused on online shopping. Persons from 'Buy Me A New Home' user group are couples who are double earners between 28-40 years. From interview, observation and online research we created two personae to represent customers from this user group. Our personae show that these are busy and thrifty individuals who focus on maintaining their families as well as managing their work to maintain comfortable lives. These customers would be attracted to sales, healthy foods for their families and convenience.
Photo
Glimpse of one of our personae
Please hover to zoom in on image.
Persona
One of our personae, Suzie Chan, is a teacher and a mother of two. She finds fetching heavy items and grocery shopping very tiresome especially more so in the winter. She's thrifty and usually looks for sales because she likes to get the best deals. Our other persona, Emily Charles, is a mother of two who also has pets. She also focuses on her career. Both of our personae are married working mothers who have busy lives.
Photo
User Interview
We were tasked with interviewing two users - one is an existing Grocery Gateway customer and the other is a new Grocery Gateway customer. Both users had to complete a set of scenarios using the Grocery Gateway mobile app and both interviews had a moderator and one or two observers. The users were asked questions about their general shopping experience, online shopping and about the scenarios they completed. The output from the sessions were video and audio recordings, participant's consent forms and observation notes.
Photo
Executive Research Presentation
After the interview we analysed our findings by discussion,brainstorming, affinity diagramming and scenario mapping. We then put together our findings to present to the executives at Grocery Gateway. We presented our top user insights and recommendations. Here is a link to our presentation. Click here to view our Executive Summary Presentation.
Photo
A Concise Affinity Diagram
Please click to view larger image or hover to zoom in on image.
Affinity Diagramming
Because we had lots of information from the interview sessions, as a group we tried to make sense of all the information because there was an abundance of data collected. We found that the affinity diagramming was a great tool to organise our thoughts and help us to agree on what areas we should focus on. The Affinity Diagram shown is a summary of the affinity diagram we created. We used real-time board to collaborate because we worked remotely to create the affinity diagram.
Photo
First Version of Customer Journey Map
Please click to view larger image or hover to zoom in on image.
Customer Journey Map
Our task was to demonstrate how showing the updated price next to the product when the quantity is increased or decreased will improve user's experience. We created a journey map to show how the user might end up taking unnecessary steps to complete this task. And how Grocery Gateway can take less of the user's time by simply showing the calculated price next to the product.
Photo
Wireframe Showing Idea 1
Photo
Wireframe Showing Idea 2
Wireframing
We came up with 2 solutions.
Solution 1
Simply show the price next to the product.
Solution 2
Here we proposed a more ambitious idea. We observed that every time the user clicks the plus or minus button a request is sent to the server. Many times when it comes to grocery shopping people would order multiple of the same item. By letting the user reach the desired quantity and then clicking on a button that adds to cart (which would then send a request to the server) can potentially reduce the number of server requests and can potentially improve overall performance. Hence the proposal for the second design.
Click Me!

Designing for 2030!
Photo
Context
We were tasked with coming up with trends for 2030 and then design a product that is suitable for that trend. Our trend was Grow Back Green - to help combat climate change new trees and plants are being sustainably planted in predictable and surprising places. The population is expected to reach 8.5 billion by 2030. It is estimated that more than 60% of the world’s population will live in cities. Farmers’ children are moving to cities and according to Statistics Canada the trends of fewer operators and fewer farms show no signs of reversing and the number of younger farmers continue to shrink. Therefore, due to need for more food but fewer farmers we came up with the idea to design a product that seeks to minimize the pain-points of manual work in farming. Hence, our product idea was born - The Drone Picker!
Date:
March 2018
Project:
Innovative Design for 2030
Name:
Shafeeza Hussain, Fernando Rivero, Shareeza Hussain, Andrew Yifan Wu, Nasrullah Hafeel
Skills:
  • Bono 6 Hat
  • Appreciative Inquiry
  • 5 Why's and Wildcard
  • Prototyping
Trends and Counter Trends
Photo
Mission
To design a product that will help farmers enhance their farm picking experience and make them more competitive in a changing and disruptive world.
Vision
To help the farming industry meet demands in the future and at the same time designing products that go in harmony with the environment
Product Idea
A robot design to pick fruits and is also accompanied with an app that counts the fruits and also has recordkeeping service.
Customer Observation Map
Photo
Prototyping - Model
Photo
Prototyping - Picking
Photo
Value Proposition
Photo
Grow Back Green
Photo
Reaching the Remote & Automation in Farming
Photo
Stick With The Known
Photo
Desirability
  • World Population Expected to reach 8.5 billion by 2030
  • By the year 2030 it is estimated that more than 60% of the world’s population will live in cities.
Feasibility
  • There are projects in their early stages that focus on Automation in Farming
  • Ongoing improvement in Technology
Viability
  • With improvement in robotics, AI and energy source these kind of machineries can be cheaper to manufacture thus becoming more affordable
Click Me!

E-Learning Experience
Photo
Introduction
For this project we engaged in a 2 weeks sprint to improve the experience of an Egg Catching Game that teaches music. Our target users were from ages 5 to 10 and we could not assume that they know how to read. For week 1 Sprint we focused on discovering what was causing the issue with catching the egg and focused on improving the child's chance of winning; hence, motivating the child to play. For week 2 Sprint we focused more on the learnability aspect.
Date:
February, 2018 - March 2018
Project:
Evaluate and Redesign The Treble Clef - ‘Catch the Egg on the Staff Game’ under Pitch and Notation unit of the RCM Theory Preparatory App
Name:
Shafeeza Hussain, Nasrullah Hafeel, Faiza Jama, Shareeza Hussain & Yifan Wu
Skills:
  • Sprint
  • Interactive Prototyping
  • How Might We Statements
  • Interviewing
Insight Into the Problem
Photo
Identifying the Problem
Photo
Week 1 How Might We
We came up with How Might We statements and decided which areas to focus on.
Photo
Story Board
One of our group member had taken music lessons and he came up with the idea of breaking up the lessons into fun smaller parts.
Photo
Week 1 Prototyping
Photo
Week 2 Sprint
For Sprint 2 we analyzed the result from Sprint 1 Photo
Week 2 How Might We
For Sprint 2 we came up with a second set of HMW statements

Photo
Week 2 Prototyping
Photo
Week 2 Feedbacks
Photo
Click Me!

Games as Analogs for Teaching Basic Programming Concepts
Photo
Abstract
Research has shown that students, especially novices, face difficulties while learning programming. Analogies are used by teachers to help students understand abstract programming concepts. However, if analogies are not well chosen they can cause misconception(s). According to Reese (n.d.) game-based technologies, which are goal oriented, provide the means to design the pragmatic constraints necessary to guide learners toward viable inferences. The games implemented in this research aim to aid novices with reading and understanding existing pieces of code as well as identifying errors in existing pieces of code. In Guyana and the Caribbean students are still required to attend lecture sessions. Therefore, the experiment carried out assessed whether introductory programming lessons complemented with games as analogs would be more effective than the traditional lecture method. The lessons were delivered to the students from the control group using the traditional lecture method whereas the lessons delivered to the students from the experimental group were complemented with games as analogs. The students who played the games performed significantly better in the assessment than the students who did not play the games. Therefore, the results are encouraging.
Date:
December, 2011 to August, 2012
Project:
An Investigation of the Use of Casual Games as Analogs for Teaching Basic Programming Concepts
Name:
Shafeeza Hussain, Ms. Penelope DeFreitas Mr. Lenandlar Singh, Mr. Max Baird
Skills:
  • Literature Review
  • Testing Hypothesis
  • Prototyping
Visualization in Programming
According to Ala-Mutka (n.d.) the learning of the basic concepts is often emphasized; these form the basis for building more advanced skills. The basic programming concepts would be the concepts serving as a starting point or basis for learning programming. An attempt to aid learning and teaching was the development of visualization materials about programming concepts (Lahtinen, n.d.). Ala-Mutka (n.d.) further stated that “According to the surveys, all respondents were confident that visualizations help students' understanding and learning of concepts.” However, statements against visualization were the amount of time that is required to create visualizations, problems teachers faced in providing the visualizations for the students in a usable way and the problems students faced in using them effectively in learning (Ala-Mutka, n.d.; Lahtinen, n.d.).
Analogy and Programming
Analogy is the comparison showing similarity between like features of two things. There are in-depth studies that indicate that using analogies assists in concept development. According to Thagard (1992) analogies are well known for helping students understand complex science concepts but they are also well known for causing misconceptions in cases where students over generalize and map not corresponding features of source and target concepts. A problem identified by Gomes and Mendes (2007) is that the teaching of dynamic concepts is usually made through static materials. According to Doukakis, Tsaganou, and Grigoriadou (2007) analogies that are appropriate for teaching programming concepts and structures are function or structural- functional analogies. Structural analogs focus on the structure of a concept and functional analogs focuses on the functions. The experiment conducted by Doukakis et al revealed that engaging novice programmers in exploratory activities with the use of a properly selected interactive animated analogy can help them deal with some of their misconceptions in the concept of programming variable. Their experiment also indicated that when students were familiar with the analog chosen they were interested in experimenting with it. Furthermore, they stated that another problem concerns students’ familiarity with the analog proposed by the teacher, the textbook writer or the educational software designer. They stated that “Unfortunately, there is not always available an analog familiar to all students, that is also appropriate for the instruction of a specific concept.” However, they noted that computer based simulations and animation give new and perhaps more efficient way to incorporate analogies in instruction.
The Lecture Method
In Guyana and the Caribbean students are still required to attend lecture sessions. According to Grimley, Green, Nilsen and Thompson (2012) lecture based instruction has been the major form of instruction in tertiary institutions for many years and will probably endure for many years to come. Grimley et al further stated that “The main benefit of lecture based instruction is that it is efficient and economic, especially in these times of economic hardship.” At the University of Guyana, for the course titled “Introduction to Programming Using C”, students are required to attend three hours lecture sessions and two hour labs. Bernard and Cummings (2003) described an integrated instructional model for integrating web based instructions and classroom teaching in educational institutions in the Caribbean. At the tertiary level students were required to study the current topic using the web based course, prior to coming to class. It was observed that due to this approach the lectures were very interactive; they became discussion of course materials where students were able to make real contributions to the discussion. Bernard and Cummings (2003) stated that “The studies show that the integrated approach facilitated more effective learning.” Therefore, a major aim of this experiment is to find out if the delivery of introductory programming lessons complemented with games as analogs would be more effective than the traditional lecture method.
Hypothesis
We propose that the delivery of introductory programming lessons complemented with games as analogs will be more effective than the lecture method.
Implementation
The three games that were implemented are Super Sticky, Cake Finder and Looping Star. These games did not specifically focus on any programming language syntax. The aim was more on helping the player remember certain basic steps or rules and tracing the values of variables as they change. When designing the games the PETTT Technical Report titled “Computer Science Education Research on Programming: What We Know and How We Know It” was used as guidance. This report was a review on literature that identified certain misconceptions students make as they program.
Photo
Super Sticky
This game seeks to introduce the player to variables.
Photo
Cake Finder
This game teaches about the selection structure: if... else. Based on the description of the cake given by the chef and the cupboard’s labels the player has to determine which cupboard the cake is in. It should be noted that this game is fairly simple to play. This may be because the question was kept simple.
Photo
Looping Star
Besides teaching about the while loop this casual game gives the player practice on four ways variables could be assigned.
A
B
O
U
T
User Experience Design Student and Online Tutor
I am currently studying for my Post Graduate Certificate in User Experience Design. Through this programme I am being introduced to Design Thinking, Empathy Mapping, Wireframe Prototyping, Persona, Contextual Inquiry, Scenario Mapping, Interviewing and Affinity Diagramming. I am also currently an online tutor for the University of Guyana. I tutor beginner programming based courses.
Employment History as a Programmer
I worked as an Analyst Programmer at the Guyana Power and Light Inc. for over three years. I had also worked at the Guyana Defence Force as a part-time Junior Software Developer. For both jobs I was involved in the creation of web-based applications. At the Guyana and Power and Light Inc. the applications I created were in-house applications that dealt with record management. These applications were created to replace paper-based systems. At the Guyana Defence Force I created front-end interactive educational pieces that were later incorporated in a Moodle based e-learning system.
Pupil Teacher II
When I was only seventeen I was a Mathematics teacher to Grade 7 and Grade 8 students. I was a motivating teacher simply because I understood my students. My classroom was filled with all sorts of students – the thoughtful, the talkative and the timid. This was my first professional job and it has played somewhat of an inspiration in my studies and my work. This experience helped me with my final year project when I was studying for my bachelors and as a programmer I am always excited to work on e-learning applications. Up to this day I still secretly observe how people learn and try to figure out what is usually hindering their progress. As an international student I have had the opportunity to observe so much more and further open my mind.

Contact

If you have any question or suggestion just send me a message!

Name required

Email required

Phone required

Message required